University of Oregon research project   Social “Coding:” Urban Processes and Socio-Computational Workflow, with Stephen Maher  The distinctive social and cultural qualities of our cities make up an increasingly dynamic and complex understanding of planning and urban ecology. How do we leverage computational design to integrate the fine-grained qualitative information that describes our urban places? In a small, private parking lot on the east side of Portland, one can eat Tuscan-made pasta e fagioli, and from a Tweet from outside Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, one can discover curry chicken samosa. These diverse qualities may now be integrated by computational designers using new geospatial data collection and visualization techniques. This paper will describe such a technique for rapidly changing adaptive urban processes including cuisine, entrepreneurship and architectural infrastructure between the human and non-human phenomenological spaces of our cities. The research presented in this paper outlines a new multi-platform data collection and geospatial visualization methodology within the Rhinoceros/Grasshopper environment including a custom component named  Elephant  to measure, codify, analyze and visualize fine-grained geospatial socio-computational data. The purpose of this new methodology is to empower urban designers, business owners and the public with greater access to integrate data and affect design computation in an accelerated real world approach to urban design.    Speranza, P. and Maher, S. (2017)  “Social ‘Coding:’ Urban Processes and Socio-Computational Workflow ,” Proceedings of the  Environmental Design Research Association Annual Meeting 2017 , May 31-June 3, 2017, Madison: Wisconsin. *   download here   Franck, K and Speranza, P, (2015) “Food, Time and Space: Mobile Cuisine in New York and Portland,”    Ethno-Architecture and the Politics of Migration    Edited by Mirjana Lozanovska, London: Routledge Press. **   download here

University of Oregon research project

Social “Coding:” Urban Processes and Socio-Computational Workflow, with Stephen Maher

The distinctive social and cultural qualities of our cities make up an increasingly dynamic and complex understanding of planning and urban ecology. How do we leverage computational design to integrate the fine-grained qualitative information that describes our urban places? In a small, private parking lot on the east side of Portland, one can eat Tuscan-made pasta e fagioli, and from a Tweet from outside Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, one can discover curry chicken samosa. These diverse qualities may now be integrated by computational designers using new geospatial data collection and visualization techniques. This paper will describe such a technique for rapidly changing adaptive urban processes including cuisine, entrepreneurship and architectural infrastructure between the human and non-human phenomenological spaces of our cities. The research presented in this paper outlines a new multi-platform data collection and geospatial visualization methodology within the Rhinoceros/Grasshopper environment including a custom component named Elephant to measure, codify, analyze and visualize fine-grained geospatial socio-computational data. The purpose of this new methodology is to empower urban designers, business owners and the public with greater access to integrate data and affect design computation in an accelerated real world approach to urban design.

Speranza, P. and Maher, S. (2017) “Social ‘Coding:’ Urban Processes and Socio-Computational Workflow,” Proceedings of the Environmental Design Research Association Annual Meeting 2017, May 31-June 3, 2017, Madison: Wisconsin. *

download here

Franck, K and Speranza, P, (2015) “Food, Time and Space: Mobile Cuisine in New York and Portland,” Ethno-Architecture and the Politics of Migration Edited by Mirjana Lozanovska, London: Routledge Press. **

download here

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